Half Accepted
Half Accepted

Acceptance is cyclical. In 2016, anti-immigrant discourse portrays immigrants as a threat to our country’s national and economic security. However, this is nothing new, as headlines from the ‘40s and ‘50s show exactly the same anti-immigrant sentiments. The times and the faces may have changed, but the prejudice still exists. While reading the headlines of past newspapers, it becomes clear that anti-immigrant rhetoric is interchangeably applied to different communities, revealing the lack of foundation in these sentiments.

Surface
Surface

This piece examines how immigrant teenagers see themselves in a changing environment, dealing with the idea of duality and the outward reflection of the self. It illustrates the sense of always looking at oneself through the eyes of others, and of evaluating one’s identity according to the values of a world that looks on in amused contempt, and sometimes, even pity.

Unvieled
Unvieled

Muslim identity has significant socio-political implications within the landscape of contemporary America. The shadow and veil in this photo represent the personal choices this individual must make in forming her self-identification as it relates to her religious and cultural affiliations. This underscores the delicate balance one must carefully achieve to attain acceptance and belonging in the so-called land of milk and honey: America.

Whats My ID
Whats My ID

How do second-generation Americans navigate existence between two cultures? How can they define their identities when they no longer feel a connection to the old, but can’t connect to the new? The flags are a symbol of dual identities: how the subject views herself and how others view her. Somalia – a distant memory – is no longer home, while America is a place in the process of becoming home. She feels no real connection to either, which begs the question, “Who am I, and where do I belong?”

Muna Malik's "Behind Both Fences"
Muna Malik's "Behind Both Fences"

On view at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs in Minneapolis, April 20-29. Hosted in partnership with the Humphrey School and Heartland Democracy, supported by the Frankel Family Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Special thanks to Mohamud Mumin.

Muna Malik's "Behind Both Fences"
Muna Malik's "Behind Both Fences"

On view at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs in Minneapolis, April 20-29. Hosted in partnership with the Humphrey School and Heartland Democracy, supported by the Frankel Family Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Special thanks to Mohamud Mumin.

Half Accepted
Surface
Unvieled
Whats My ID
Muna Malik's "Behind Both Fences"
Muna Malik's "Behind Both Fences"
Half Accepted

Acceptance is cyclical. In 2016, anti-immigrant discourse portrays immigrants as a threat to our country’s national and economic security. However, this is nothing new, as headlines from the ‘40s and ‘50s show exactly the same anti-immigrant sentiments. The times and the faces may have changed, but the prejudice still exists. While reading the headlines of past newspapers, it becomes clear that anti-immigrant rhetoric is interchangeably applied to different communities, revealing the lack of foundation in these sentiments.

Surface

This piece examines how immigrant teenagers see themselves in a changing environment, dealing with the idea of duality and the outward reflection of the self. It illustrates the sense of always looking at oneself through the eyes of others, and of evaluating one’s identity according to the values of a world that looks on in amused contempt, and sometimes, even pity.

Unvieled

Muslim identity has significant socio-political implications within the landscape of contemporary America. The shadow and veil in this photo represent the personal choices this individual must make in forming her self-identification as it relates to her religious and cultural affiliations. This underscores the delicate balance one must carefully achieve to attain acceptance and belonging in the so-called land of milk and honey: America.

Whats My ID

How do second-generation Americans navigate existence between two cultures? How can they define their identities when they no longer feel a connection to the old, but can’t connect to the new? The flags are a symbol of dual identities: how the subject views herself and how others view her. Somalia – a distant memory – is no longer home, while America is a place in the process of becoming home. She feels no real connection to either, which begs the question, “Who am I, and where do I belong?”

Muna Malik's "Behind Both Fences"

On view at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs in Minneapolis, April 20-29. Hosted in partnership with the Humphrey School and Heartland Democracy, supported by the Frankel Family Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Special thanks to Mohamud Mumin.

Muna Malik's "Behind Both Fences"

On view at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs in Minneapolis, April 20-29. Hosted in partnership with the Humphrey School and Heartland Democracy, supported by the Frankel Family Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Special thanks to Mohamud Mumin.

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